Quick links:
 Latest Team Rankings
 Free Rivals Alerts
 Member Services
ShopMobileRadio RSSRivals.com Yahoo! Sports

October 19, 2010

Scout's Eye View: Breaking down the big plays



Most college football fans, when watching a game for the sake of enjoyment, simply follow the ball and pay little mind to what is happening on the field as far as positional groupings, schemes and whatnot. Each week InsidetheGators.net will take you 'behind the scenes' as former NFL scout Edwin Weathersby breaks down several of the biggest plays of the game.

WATCH THE HIGHLIGHTS AS YOU READ THE BREAKDOWN

Omarius Hines touchdown run (1:21 mark on the tape)

The Gators show a shotgun split backs back field, and hold in a fullback/wing back/tight end to the strong or field side going to the right. Since UF has extremely athletic personnel and talent on offense, Urban Meyer and Steve Addazio always look to give their athletic playmakers as much room to operate as possible, thus many of the UF plays always going to wide side of the field.

The play design is pretty creative, as it's a simple option play, but ran out of shotgun and split backs. Out of the huddle, the defender who is being attacked by the play call is the MSU left defensive end. Upon the snap, MSU walks their strong safety Corey Broomfield, down to the box and aligns him wide, outside of the left defensive end.

Florida fullback Steven Wilks, aligned as the wing back, sees that the he is likely assigned to the walked up Broomfield in coverage, so at the snap, he attempts to run him off. Trey Burton takes the snap and fakes the inside dive to Jeff Demps, then he knows now it's time to attack the defensive and make a decision.

Hines is trailing Burton alert for the pitch. Broomfield isn't fooled by Wilks dummy route and quickly reads run, which he comes up to meet Burton. Seeing that Broomfield and the defensive end are collapsing on him, Burton makes the decision to pitch the ball out to a trailing Hines, who with the help of a great perimeter sustained block by receiver Frankie Hammond Jr., walks into the endzone.

Demps fourth quarter run off of a John Brantley audible (2:08 mark on the tape)

Out of a single back, trips look Brantley seems to either not like the initial play call vs. this particular MSU box alignment, recognizes a 'backer ready to blitz the desired hole for Demps, or doesn't like Burton's blocking angle vs. the blitzing linebacker. Whatever the case, a very good command of the offense and ability to get his team into the right play is shown by the Gator signal caller, as he pulls Burton down from the slot to the wing and brings Demps up to set up the run play.

The MSU linebacker is forced to go around Burton, aligned in the wing and combined with a solid combo block by the left tackle to get action on the play-side linebacker, Demps reads his blocks by receivers Carl Moore and Deonte Thompson to get to the perimeter and up field for a Gator 1st down. While Demps is credited for the positive play, it all started the recognition skills of Brantley.

Edwin Weathersby has worked in scouting/player personnel departments for three professional football teams, including the New York Giants, Cleveland Browns, and the Las Vegas Gladiators of the Arena League. He spent a year evaluating prep prospects & writing specific scouting content articles for Student Sports Football (now ESPN Rise). He's also contributed to WeAreSC.com, and Diamonds in the Rough Inc., a College Football and NFL Draft magazine.




FEATURED PRODUCT

Georgia NEWS

[More]

Latest Headlines:


 

Rivals.com is your source for: College Football | Football Recruiting | College Basketball | Basketball Recruiting | College Baseball | High School | College Merchandise
Site-specific editorial/photos UGASports.com. All rights reserved. This website is an officially and independently operated source of news and information not affiliated with any school or team.
About | Advertise with Us | Contact | Privacy Policy | About our Ads | Terms of Service | Copyright/IP policy | Yahoo! Sports - NBC Sports Network

Statistical information 2014 STATS LLC All Rights Reserved.